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It’s Over

By From the April 2012 issue

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Yes, that's what they're saying, beginning with the pontifical George Will: Obama's a shoo-in this fall, all because he'll be running against a Republican no one wants to see in Washington let alone the White House. The president's a nice guy, after all-Mitt Romney says so himself. Meanwhile, the economy's less dead than it was, the debt crisis has vanished from sight, unemployment numbers are no longer being reported, Obamacare is a nonissue, Iran is just bluffing, and we're bound to withdraw from Afghanistan, one of these decades. There are more pressing matters to attend to, such as the Republicans' war on the bedroom and distrust of sexual nirvana, not to mention their distinct contempt for the financial, emotional, and medical needs of feminist law school activists and Democratic operatives. Plus the president has a killer new campaign slogan: Five More Years! After which he promises he'll buy himself a shiny new electric Chevy Volt.

Of course, he made that promise just days before the Volt suspended production. But what do we know. In the old continent of Europe, where being in the know is a natural right, the Volt has been named Car of the Year. Now the future former President Obama will end up driving a fancy European import. Although too late to vindicate Rick Santorum, the "snob" label will finally stick.

And green business as usual will continue as before in Obamaized America: cronyish, corrupt (as if anyone still cared about such a loaded term), and government-sponsored capitalist. For a taste of how it all will work, sample Jim Antle's investigative tribute to "Solyndra Nation" (p. 14). As one of the players, appropriately named Spinner, put it, everyone was "itchy to get involved." It's nice insider work, in other words, assuming taxpayers will cheerfully continue to underwrite the president's spending habits. That could be asking too much of them, according to someone in a position to know (see Grover Norquist, p. 42).

If we have become an unabashedly immoral country, then we're also a demoralized one. Bill Tucker wants to be optimistic (see p. 32), but it's hard when confronted by Charles Murray's latest findings, which depict an American working class left to its own devices by a self-absorbed elite that would rather be tooling around France in a nonpolluting Volt than setting high standards for all of society. A preference for French methods also lies at the heart of Obamacare's war on the Church, though readers of F. H. Buckley's "Liberal Imperialism" (p. 38) might prefer a rather non-French descriptive–Kulturkampf. The initiators of such campaigns do not intend to lose them.

Most everyone plays dirty now. One exception is Peter Wallison (p. 20), who had the gall to dissent from the majority report of the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission. He argues from facts. Those who disagree with him argue from vitriol. Leading the effort to remove Wallison from approved society is a New York Times columnist named Joe Nocera-who really should be attacking himself, unless he actually didn't coauthor the recent book in which he and his coauthor make very similar points that he now won't allow Wallison but instead dismisses as Goebbelsian lunacy. Welcome to the world of the New York Times and the guaranteed reelection of President Barack Obama.

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About the Author
Wlady Pleszczynski is editorial director of The American Spectator and the editor of AmSpec Online.